Category Archives: Health

Canines Dealing with Dry, Itchy Skin in the Winter

The furnace is on! This winter has been a cold one and we still have February and March to go before Spring arrives. While our furnaces work to keep us warm, they rob our air of moisture so you may find your indoor pet experiencing dry skin and shedding. This is usually the result of low humidity. Frequent brushing helps remove dead hair and skin and stimulates oil glands but brushing alone is often not enough to keep a dog’s skin and coat healthy; diet and supplements can play a major roll here as well.

Many skin disorders and other health problems of pets are caused by a lack of proper fats in the diet. The most important types are Omega 3s and Omega 6s. These essential fatty acids (EFAs) are polyunsaturated fatty acids that the body needs for health but cannot make on its own. EFAs must be obtained from food. The body needs EFAs to make and repair cell membranes. They also govern growth, vitality, mental state, oxygen transfer, hemoglobin production and control the movement of nutrients through cell membranes. The most important Omega-3 fatty acids for pets are docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

EFAs play a key role in both the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Lack of sufficient EFAs tends to manifest in the skin first. The skin is the first to lose oils and the last to get them. The deficiency can lead to dry, flaky, itchy skin. Another area of the body influenced by the dietary imbalance of EFAs is the joints; arthritis is merely an inflammation of the joints. Studies have shown that adding fish oil to the diet can reduce the stiffness, pain and inflammation associated with this debilitating disease. Supplementing fish oil in the diet can prevent or reduce the development of arthritis in the first place. Some animals have trouble absorbing oils in their diet. Digestive enzymes, such as papaya, found in Digestive Enzymes by NaturVet or aspergillus, found in Prozyme, can be added to the diet to increase absorption of EFAs by 200%.

Misty Pines carries Grizzly Salmon oil, recommended by Dr. Doug Kneuven, and UltraOil, both of which are oils balanced to provide the optimum levels of Omega-3, Omega-6 and Omega-9 fatty acids. It is recommended to rotate between bottles, meaning that when you’ve finished the Grizzly, get the UltraOil next time. Each different type of oil contains the EFAs in different quantities so rotational usage ensures that all the body’s needs are being met. Misty Pines also carries Prozyme and Digestive Enzymes, which are recommended by Dr. Kneuven. Stop in to Misty Pines today and get 10% off any Salmon, Pollock or UltraOil products as well as Prozyme or Digestive Enzymes.


Canine Nutrition. What Every Owner, Breeder, and Trainer Should Know by Lowell Ackerman, D.V.M.
Why Fish Oil for a Dog by Dr. Doug Knueven D.V.M.

Misty Pines’ Dog Resolutions Are Here to Serve You in the New Year and Beyond

DOG RESOLUTIONS: the act of you and your dog determining to make a firm decision to do something to improve life and to have fun with each other.

Each Holiday comes with its own set of traditions and for New Year’s it is customary to set resolutions that you’ll carry out in the new year. This year, why not make a few resolutions for you and your dog? We’ve listed a few that we feel will help 2018 be a better year for you and your pet.

Keep Up With Training and Exercising Your Dog

Much like humans, who decide to get back into shape, polish up on or learn a new skill, dogs enjoy being with and benefit from working with their leaders. To help you and your dog to have fun and enjoy each other, we would encourage you and your family pack to come to dog training classes! Misty Pines classes are designed to be very accessible and easy-to-use. Classes are on-going and run continuously throughout the year. You participate and advance at your convenience. We have found that this is an excellent system for busy families. Our class structure allows you and your dog to start training or drop in for remedial work anytime. We all get rusty if we do not practice, so stop in and join us to maintain all the good things that you have learned and taught your wonderful dog and learn more! You are always welcome to start or return to class no matter how long you have been away. You and your dog always have the opportunity to continue to learn, socialize and exercise throughout the years.

Stimulating Your Dog’s Mind

Studies show that mental stimulation can help reduce cognitive deterioration in aging animals. In other words, keeping your senior pet’s brain active can actually make it healthier! Teaching your pet new tricks and practicing those they already know are a great way to keep those neurons firing. Our Tricks and Clicks class coming up in February is a great way to add new tricks to your repertoire and challenge your dog to work through fun, challenging behaviors.

Prolonged release interactive food dispensing devices, which makes a pet think in order to be rewarded with their meal, are an excellent way to keep a pet’s mind engaged. We also recommend Bob-A-Lots, Kongs and raw femur bones, which we have at our facility.

For Those That Need A Boost

Boot Camp/Training: Sometimes owners do not have the time or expertise to teach dogs and they need a “jump start” in training to help them accelerate to a higher level. This program develops a dog’s ability to learn various behaviors; specific training exercises will vary with the needs of each owner and their dog. At the end of the two week Boot Camp you will take home a full report of your dog’s daily working journal that reviews the training they have done. A scheduled lesson when you pick up your dog is included and the best way to review and learn from the trainers the transition of what your dog has learned from Misty Pines to your home.

Put an End to Your Dog’s Behavior Issues

Nothing prevents an owner from enjoying their dog like annoying canine behavior problems. Consult with one of the Professional Dog Trainers at Misty Pines to solve their problem. Misty Pines offers Private Canine Behavior Consultations as well as Nuisance Behaviors classes throughout the year. Private Canine Behavior Consultations are by appointment and our group Nuisance Behavior class is held on the fifth Saturday of each eligible month at 8:00 am. These classes deal specifically with problem behaviors such as barking, play-biting, and jumping up, just to name a few. Check our online calendar for a list of class dates and to register online.

Give Opportunities for Exercise

Try a New Activity with Your Pet

Treadmilling, hiking, agility, dock diving, scent work; it’s easier than ever for people to incorporate their pet into a new exercise routine. It’s a great way to bond and it will get you both out of the house to reap the rewards of a healthy physical activity. Group classes are a great way to find like-minded pet owners to join you in your exercise, too!

An 8 – 5:00 Full Dog-Day

Daycare\Training is also an excellent way for your dog to learn, socialize, and exercise. Our supervised exercise yards are superb for helping your dog exercise and socialize with other friendly dogs and while they are here you can schedule treadmill work or training for them. Your dog will return home relaxed, well exercised, and well trained! If you would like to have your dog return home clean and smelling fresh, add on a bath or haircut. Our professional groomers will shampoo your dog, cut their nails, clean their ears and having them looking their best when you come to pick them up. And don’t forget, you can come in any time for a nail trim for just $11.

Feed Healthier

Measure Your Pet’s Food – Every Time!

Many owners “eyeball” their pet’s daily intake of food and pour that into a bowl, usually resulting in overfeeding and weight gain. It’s important to use a consistent measuring cup to ensure your pet is not taking in more calories than they need. Older pets and those who have been neutered usually have lower energy needs than young, intact animals.

Counting Calories: Not As Difficult As You Might Think

Resting energy requirement (RER) is the number of calories per day your dog requires for just basic needs. To determine your dog’s RER, convert his ideal target weight in pounds to kilograms by dividing by 2.2, then multiply that number by 30 and add 70.

Measurement Conversion and Calculation

– To convert pounds to kilograms, divide by 2.2. A dog who weighs 11 pounds also weighs 5 kilograms (11 ÷ 2.2 = 5).

– To determine your dog’s resting energy requirement (RER), or kilocalories each day, multiply your dog’s ideal body weight in kilograms by 30 and add 70.

Example: If your dog’s targeted ideal body weight is 50lbs and its diet is Nature’s Variety Raw Boost, which has 527 kcal/cup*, then:

50lbs ÷ 2.2 = 22.72kg

22.72kg x 30 = 681.60

681 + 70 = 751.60 calories per day.

A 50lb dog would require 1.43 cups per day.

Note: Increase the volume of food when exercise increases and more calories are required.

*kcal/cup is found on the label of the dog food bag.

Groom Your Pet Daily

Brushing your pet serves many purposes. It removes excess fur from the coat, reducing the amount you find on your clothes and furniture, helps distribute oils from the skin to the fur, keeping the coat shiny and healthy and daily grooming can be a bonding activity that demonstrates to your pet how much you love them as you care for them in a very soothing manner. Visit or call Misty Pines to ask our professional groomers which comb or brush is best for your pet.

Microchip Your Dog

During the summer of 2017 one of our clients found a dog and brought it to Misty Pines to have us check for a microchip. Our universal scanner identified the chip and we were able to reunite the dog with its owners within a few hours. This is the importance of microchipping your dog. We use the “Buddy ID microchips” which are the smallest microchips and injector needle currently available on the market. These microchips are half the size of most other chips, which ensures the most painless delivery of all microchips on the market into your pet due to their smaller gauge injector needle. The cost of $35 includes the microchip and the five minute implanting process, it also covers your enrollment in the worldwide pet database, a dog tag with your pets ID number, and access to your profile online to keep a changing address and information up-to-date. Lastly, Buddy ID does not have a monthly or yearly fee like some other microchip companies. Show your pet how much you care and call today to set up an appointment to have your pet microchipped at Misty Pines and you’ll be able to rest a little easier in 2018.

If Your Dog Already Has A Microchip, Update Your Pets ID Info

Over the course of a year, a lot can change — people move, get new phone numbers, and forget to update their pet’s tags. All too often they only remember once the pet is lost. If any of your contact information has changed in 2017, don’t wait. Update your pet’s tags and microchip information today! It’s the best way to ensure a lost pet makes their way home, safely. If your pet is not protected with a microchip ID and you would like to add that layer of security and peace of mind, call Misty Pines today to set up an appointment. Microchipping only takes five minutes.

Don’t let your resolutions go by the wayside this year. A recent comic in a local newspaper portrayed two dogs staring up into the sky. The smaller of the two asked the larger, “What are New Year Resolutions?” to which the larger dog replied, “‘To Do’ lists for the first two weeks of January.” It doesn’t matter that the year changed, what matters is that we see a need to make changes, plan how to make those changes come about and then have the fortitude to do what needs done to see our plans through to completion.

In 2018, remember; Misty Pines is the complete pet company that loves the company of people and pets. We are here for the lifetime of your dog.

Happy New Year!

Holiday Hazards

By Misty Pines Pet Company

The holiday season brings excitement and commotion associated with shopping, travel, and other seasonal preparations. In all the activities of the season our beloved pets may be exposed to hazards that are not found other times of the year. As homes fill with holiday spirit, pets may be intrigued by the new sites, smells and tastes. The following are some of the most common health concerns for your pet during the holidays. If you have specific questions regarding any health concern, please contact your veterinarian. It may be difficult to curb your pet’s fascination with all those pretty decorations. Child gates can be used across doorways to keep your pet away from the Christmas tree and decorations at times they cannot be watched.

    Holiday Lights

  • Decorative lights are an attraction for pets to chew on. Both indoor and outdoor lights should be carefully examined to ensure safety for your household pets. Electrical shock may occur from defective cords as well as from them chewing on cords. Check cords for any signs of bite marks, loose or frayed wires, proximity to the tree’s water supply or evidence of short circuits. Use grounded “3-prong” extension cords and strictly follow manufacturer’s guidelines for light usage.
  • Electrical shock can cause burns, difficulty breathing, abnormal heart rhythm, loss of consciousness, and death. Call a veterinarian immediately if your pet has been injured by electrical shock. Treatment will be most effective if begun soon after the shock. Bubble Lights: They contain a small amount of methylene chloride, which is also found in paint removers. It is a moderately toxic solvent.
    Tinsel, Ribbon and other “Shiny” Things

  • Ribbons, wrapping paper, ornaments, tinsel, and gifts may be appealing “chew toys” that may make your pet sick. There is something about those shiny strands of Christmas tree decor, which drives kitties wild. Although the sight of your cat pawing at the tree may be cute, the ingestion of tinsel can be deadly. Eating tinsel or other string-like items such as ribbon can cause serious damage to the intestine. One end can get stuck while the rest is pulled into the intestine as it contracts; the contractions may cause the ribbon or tinsel to cut through the intestine. If not caught in time, infection of the belly cavity develops and the prognosis for recovery becomes poor. Pets can become ill quickly and symptoms including vomiting, diarrhea, depression, belly pain and sometimes fever.
  • Angel hair ornaments are a finely spun glass that is toxic and potentially obstructive if ingested. Also be aware that antique or foreign-made ornaments may be decorated with lead-based paint. Eating other holiday decorations can cause signs ranging from mild depression to severe vomiting or diarrhea, depending upon whether or not the foreign body can be passed in the stool or gets stuck along the way. Sometimes foreign bodies stuck in the intestine do not show up on “x-ray” but will trap air in the intestine, which helps your veterinarian make a diagnosis. Surgery is required to remove foreign bodies that do not pass on their own.
    Water and other liquids

  • Even though they have their own water bowl, there is something enticing about other sources of water; whether it’s the toilet bowl or the Christmas tree stand. If you add chemicals to the water meant to keep your tree fresh longer, be sure to read the label to make sure it is safe for pets. Stagnant tree water can also contain bacteria, which can lead to vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Potpourri makes your house smell festive but may be another attraction for pets to drink. Make sure that potpourri pots are covered or otherwise inaccessible to pets.
  • Snow globes may contain antifreeze, which is extremely toxic to dogs. Very small amounts can be lethal, as little as one teaspoon can be deadly to a cat. If there is a snow globe spill of any kind, send your pet out of the room while you clean up the liquid. Dilute the spot with water and floor cleaner to make sure your dog does not lick these harmful chemicals later.

  • Well-intentioned family and friends may share holiday foods with pets causing the pet to develop an upset stomach. Pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas can be caused by eating fatty foods. To control excessive food intake by your pets and to meet your guests’ desires to feed the pets, have the treats your pets would normally receive and let your guests “treat” the pets.
    The following foods are not pet friendly:

  • Coffee: Contains caffeine which is a stimulant, and depending on the dose ingested, signs may include stimulation, restlessness, increased heart rate, tremors, or seizures.
  • Macadamia Nuts: Can cause muscular weakness, depression, vomiting, disorientation, tremors, abdominal pain and muscle stiffness. The effects can last 1-3 days.
  • Grapes and Raisins: Can develop kidney failure if large amounts are ingested of either of them.
  • Chocolate:Theobromine is the toxic compound found in chocolate. The darker the chocolate, they more toxic it is. Symptoms may appear within 1 to 4 hours of eating and include vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, hyperactivity, increased thirst, urination and heart rate.
  • Alcohol: Can cause alcohol poisoning. The pet may become weak, severely depressed, and go into a coma.
  • Yeast dough: Uncooked yeast dough can raise in the stomach and cause severe pain when ingested. It can also cause bloat, vomiting, disorientation and depression. Since the breakdown product of rising dough is alcohol, it can cause alcohol poisoning. Many cases like this require surgical removal of the dough. Even small amounts can be dangerous.
  • Bones: Cooked bones can splinter and cause intestinal blockages.
  • Xylitol: Be aware of candy or foods containing the sweetener xylitol, which is now common in a lot of sweets and gums. Side effects can be seen in as little as six minutes after consumption. The pet will become lethargic, weak, have a loss of coordination, seizures, and fall into a coma. Even small amounts of xylitol sweetener can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to depression, lack of coordination and seizures.
    Some examples of toxic holiday plants

  • Holly
  • Amaryllis
  • Mistletoe
  • Poinsettia
  • Christmas cactus, Thanksgiving cactus, Easter cactus
  • American bittersweet
  • European bittersweet
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Christmas rose
  • Jerusalem cherry
  • Autumn crocus
  • Christmas palm
  • Christmas orchid
  • Christmas dagger fern
  • Mistletoes cactus
  • Burning bush
  • Lilies

Extra attention from visiting relatives and friends may be relished by some pets while others seek solitude in their favorite hiding spot. Make sure pets are given some “personal space” if they want to get away from all of the activity. Some pets may respond to all the commotion with a change in behavior including bad behaviors like eliminating in the house. Try spending extra “quality time” with them to assure them that they have not been forgotten.

Dog Etiquette: Turning Your Dog Into A Gracious Guest

By Karen B. London, PhD

Is your dog ready for the holidays?

Turning your dog into a gracious house guest.Shortly after we were married, my husband and I spent the holidays with my in-laws, and we brought our young dog, Bugsy. He was social; had an excellent stay; came when called; had no history of food thievery; and would not lift his leg indoors, even on a tree, so my confidence in his visiting skills was high.

On arrival, as he occupied himself with a stuffed Kong so we could unpack the car, a possible problem occurred to me. Bugsy often tossed his Kong into the air and ate any treats that flew out of it. In our poor students’ apartment, it was endearing, entertaining behavior. But my in-laws’ decor included crystal, collectible figurines and an array of china teacups. Racing into the house in a panic, I caught the Kong in midair as it flew toward a set of porcelain miniatures. As I breathed a sigh of relief, it occurred to me that perhaps I had been a bit smug in thinking the trip would be stress-free.

This time of year generates tales of woe associated with bringing dogs to visit friends and relatives, and I get a lot of questions about this issue. Whether or not people fully anticipate the trouble that awaits them, taking a dog into someone else’s home for the holidays can cause stress. The best approach for assuaging this seasonal angst is two-pronged: Prepare your dog as much as you can ahead of time with the skills he’ll need to succeed during the visit, and make every effort to avoid other situations for which he hasn’t been prepared.

The preliminary step, of course, is to request permission to bring him along. Not everyone wants a visiting dog. Even dog lovers appreciate the advance warning that allows them to, for example, put away the Ming vase on display at the precise height of the perpetually swinging tail of your cheerful Great Dane. If your dog is not welcome, don’t bring him, or find somewhere else to stay. The strain of a visit with an unwelcome dog can permanently damage relationships. Plus, it’s hard on the dog to be Undesirable Number One in an otherwise festive home.

Training is a critical aspect of preparation. The better trained your dog is, the more welcome you will both be as guests. The key skills are to be able to sit, stay, come, leave it, greet politely, and stop barking on cue. It sounds like a long list, but these are also the basics of polite canine citizenship. I also recommend that you teach your dog at least one “show-off” behavior. This can be waiting at the door until told to proceed (easy to teach but impressive to most people) or a trick such as “roll over” or “high five.” Anything that makes your dog more charming will help ease tensions in case of a social gaffe. For example, I had a client whose dog jumped up on her father-in-law, but was forgiven immediately when she gave the cue “You goofed,” and the dog responded by lying down and covering his face with his paws, as though in embarrassment.

Dog gives High Five

Common host complaints include barking, jumping up on visitors and stealing food. Of course, if he is prone to more serious transgressions such as biting, unmanageable destructive chewing or house-soiling, it is unfair to expect your dog and your hosts to co-exist peacefully, and it may be best not to go a-visiting with him in tow.

Teach your dog the skills he’ll need to be a gracious guest. If he’s a barker, teach him to stop on cue. Say “enough” the instant he starts to bark, and then put treats right by his nose. Do not let him have the treats until he stops barking. Many dogs quickly learn that quieting down when you say “enough” is a way to get treats. If he jumps up on people, teach him that if he does this, the people will leave, but if he sits, he will get treats and attention. Since the majority of jumpers do so out of an urge to be social, they quickly learn that jumping up makes people go away. They choose to sit instead, which results in the opportunity to socialize and get treats as well.

Even if you prepare ahead of time, there’s plenty to do during your visit to make sure that the holiday is remembered as a fun one rather than as the last family holiday to which you were allowed to bring your dog. Exercise, chews, toys and puzzles can minimize behavioral issues such as destructive chewing and counter-surfing, which tend to worsen when dogs are bored or full of pent-up energy. Bring a crate if your dog likes it and your hosts have enough space. Help clean up, especially if the mess involves dog hair or sloppy drinking at the water bowl. Seize the opportunity to put leftovers out of your dog’s reach, and volunteer to take out the trash.

As soon as possible after you arrive, practice the skills your dog already knows so that he can learn to do them in new places, too. One of the things that separates professional trainers from novices is that professionals know that training doesn’t automatically transfer to new locations. For example, just because your dog has a rock-solid stay in your living room doesn’t mean he knows how to respond in the same way in your yard, at the park or at Grandma’s house. Even a couple of five-minute training sessions can significantly improve your dog’s performance and manners.

Obedience skills aren’t the only ones that may drop off away from home. Many dogs who are completely trustworthy when left at home alone are stressed, scared or mischievous when left alone in a new place, all of which can result in house-soiling or the aforementioned destructive chewing or counter-surfing. The change in routine, a new place and additional people may also make dogs more likely to exhibit these unwanted behaviors. Adjust your plans—and expectations—accordingly.

Faux pas may occur, but focusing on prevention will help your dog succeed. Don’t set up your highly food-motivated dog to fail by leaving him alone, even for a minute, while the turkey is on the table. If you know your dog has a tendency to find food or shoes, don’t put temptation in his way. Make some areas of the house off limits, or use a crate so that your dog never gets the opportunity to display anything but his best behavior.

No matter how things go, send a thank-you note to your hosts, perhaps accompanied by flowers, to express your gratitude that you and your dog were welcomed into their home (and, if necessary, to apologize).

Ideally, holidays are fun, not stressful. With thoughtful preparation and prevention, you can insulate yourself, your dog and your hosts from the dark side of this festive season. You will then be free to focus on the joy of togetherness for everyone, whether they sing “Fa la la la la” or “Bow wow wow wow wow.”

Canine Cancer

November is National Canine Cancer Awareness Month.  We have compiled information from three different websites into one article to give you some basic information about canine cancer. We will list the six most common canine cancer types, information about some of the treatment options and videos showing information about cancer in general and how cancer develops. It is our goal to give you basic information that may help you make educated decisions for your pet.

6 most common canine cancers

Learning your dog has cancer is a frightening experience, but according to the National Canine Cancer Foundation (NCCF), it is a diagnosis one out of every three dogs will receive during their lifetime. The good news is, about half of all canine cancers are treatable if they are caught early and several promising research studies are currently being conducted to help find a cure.

Cancer comes in many forms, including carcinoma, sarcoma, melanoma, lymphoma, and leukemia, and can occur at any age in both mixed breeds and purebreds. Listed below are the most common types of cancer affecting dogs and the signs to look for at home.

Lymphoma: Lymphoma occurs in cells in the lymph nodes or bone marrow and is most commonly diagnosed in dogs between the ages of 6 and 9 years old. Lymphoma affects the dog’s immune system and can spread rapidly if left untreated. It is classified in five progressive stages and treatment options vary depending on the stage. The first sign of lymphoma is typically a painless, swollen lymph node in the neck or behind the knees.

Hemangiosarcoma: Hemangiosarcoma is a malignant cancer of the blood vessels. It is more common in dogs than any other species. Hemangiosarcoma is commonly diagnosed in the spleen, liver, and heart, but can travel to any organ or occur just under the skin. Because there are no distinct early warning signs for hemangiosarcoma, many dogs are not diagnosed until the disease has reached its advanced stages. It is often seen in German shepherd dogs, golden retrievers, and other large breeds.

Mast cell tumors: Mast cell tumors are an extremely common form of cancer in older dogs and mixed breeds, as well as boxers, Boston terriers, Labrador retrievers, beagles, and schnauzers. Mast cells are found in the skin and other tissues, like the intestines or respiratory tract. They contain large amounts of histamines and enzymes that protect the body, but when tumors develop, that protection turns against the immune system. The first sign of a mast cell tumor is usually a lesion on the skin. Some mast cell tumors can also be uncomfortable and cause agitation.

Melanoma: Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that can be found in the nail beds, footpads, and eyes, but the vast majority of melanoma tumors start in the mouth or around the lips. Melanoma tumors are highly aggressive, growing deep into the skin to invade vital organs. The first sign of melanoma might appear as a swollen paw, an eye that drains, or a sore in or near the mouth.

Osteosarcoma: Osteosarcoma is cancer of the bone. Approximately 85 percent of osteosarcoma tumors are malignant, and grow very quickly. Osteosarcoma commonly affects large breeds between the ages of 4 and 7 years old, including Great Danes, Irish setters, Doberman pinschers, Rottweilers, German shepherd dogs, and golden retrievers. While osteosarcoma can occur in any bone, it most commonly affects the limbs. Initial signs of osteosarcoma may include swelling and lameness.

Mammary cancer: According to the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS), mammary tumors are more common in female dogs that are either not spayed or were spayed after 2 years of age. About 50 percent of all mammary tumors are malignant and have metastasized, or spread to other areas of the body, by the time they are surgically removed. Signs of mammary cancer are often overlooked because the tumors appear as a small nodule on or around the dog’s nipple; however, this type of cancer can also present itself as a painful tumor around the nipple.

Early Warning Signs of Cancer
  • Abnormal swelling
  • A sore that does not heal
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Bleeding or discharge from any opening on the body
  • Unpleasant or unusual odor
  • Difficulty eating or swallowing
  • Loss of energy
  • Ongoing lameness or stiffness
  • Difficulty breathing, urinating, or defecating

*Information from the National Canine Cancer Foundation (NCCF)

Treating Canine Cancer

Most treatment plans for canine tumors involve surgical removal of the tumor. Depending on the tumor type and location, your veterinarian may recommend adding other treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Chemotherapy drugs work by damaging rapidly dividing cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Because of this, normal tissues that also rapidly divide, such as those found in the intestine, bone marrow, and hair, can be transiently affected by chemotherapy. Many owners hesitate to pursue chemotherapy in their pets based on their knowledge of side effects in human cancer patients. It is important to remember that chemotherapy protocols are very different for dogs. Veterinary oncologists have a different goal, which is to provide a good quality of life with minimal side effects. For this reason the doses of chemotherapy are lower in dogs than in people, and side effects are much less common. Should side effects occur, the drug doses are lowered for future treatments.

More Information About Canine Cancer

Despite every effort, pet cancer rates continue to rise. asked WHY… The video and link below are from They have a 5 part mini-series which is all available on their website.

Visit for their article on canine and feline cancer, how it develops and their recommendations for treatments.

Ep. 1: The History of Animal Cancer


6 Most Common Canine Cancers –
Most Common Canine Tumors –
Ep. 1: The History of Animal Cancer –


Upcoming Specialty Classes

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Sat 17

CGC/TDI Prep Class

March 17 @ 8:00 am - 9:00 am
Sat 17

Scent Work 102

March 17 @ 11:15 am - 12:00 pm
Sat 24

Agility Class

March 24 @ 8:00 am - 9:00 am
Sat 24

Scent Work 103

March 24 @ 11:15 am - 12:00 pm
Sat 31

Nuisance Behaviors

March 31 @ 8:00 am - 9:00 am