Gazette

March 2017 – Volume XIII: Issue 03

February is National Pet Dental Health Month

Conformation Classes

Conformation 101: Beginner Handling – March 5 from 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Beginner Handling 101 is offered to all dogs whose owners want to learn handling skills. In a fun, relaxed environment, we will discuss show terminology, ring etiquette and what to expect at dog shows. Students will learn how to stack and gait their dog as well as basic patterns. No prior experience is required, and novice handlers are highly encouraged to attend. All dogs over 4 months of age are welcome to attend.

Conformation 102: Open Handling – March 5 from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Open Handling 102 is your standard competition handling class and is open to purebred dogs whose owners wish to build their dog’s skill in the ring and practice for upcoming shows. Owners should have a basic understanding of handling as this class focuses on practice and preparation for the show ring. Purebreds over 4 months of age are welcome to attend.

Registration online, by phone or e-mail required to attend class.


Around The Horn

This advanced activity involves teaching a dog to run a series of obstacles, retrieve a dumbbell, turn and run the obstacles reversed back to the handler at the beginning of the course. Read below to ensure you and your dog meet the requirements for each class. Registration online, by phone or e-mail required to attend class.

Around The Horn 101 – March 11 from 11:15 am to 12:00 pm
101 Requirement: Dog should be fluent in: weave polls, tunnel, scramble, jumps, ladder, bridge. Must be able to perform 5 basics (Sit, Down, Come, Stay, Heel) off leash. Dog must be physically fit as this is a rigorous activity.

Around The Horn 102 – March 18 from 11:15 am to 12:00 pm
102 Requirement: Dog should be fluent in: dumbbell retrieving, weave polls, tunnel, scramble, jumps, ladder, bridge. Must be able to perform 5 basics (Sit, Down, Come, Stay, Heel) off leash. Dog must be physically fit as this is a rigorous activity.

Registration online, by phone or e-mail required to attend class.


Reliable Retrieve Class

Reliable Retrieve 101 – March 25 from 11:15 am to 12:00 pm
Reliable Retrieve 102 – April 8 from 11:15 am to 12:00 pm

All Levels Welcome

Teaching owners and their dogs how to master their retrieves utilizing both negative and positive reinforcement. This class will teach you how to teach your dog to “fetch,” “hold” and “give.”

Registration online, by phone or e-mail required to attend class.


Socialization Tips for Puppy Owners

Socialization tips for puppy owners

Even though dogs have been domesticated for thousands of years, each new puppy that comes into our world must learn about humans. Socialization is the process during which puppies 3 weeks to 4 months of age develop positive relationships with other living beings. The experiences a puppy has during this time will have a major influence on its developing personality and how well it gets along with people and other animals when it grows into adulthood. It is very important for puppies to have frequent, positive social experiences during these early months in order to prevent asocial behavior, fear, and biting. Puppies that are inadequately socialized may develop irreversible fears, leading to timidity or aggression. This is not to say that socialization is complete by 4 months of age; only that it should begin before that time. Continued well-planned exposures to a variety of people and other animals, as the pet grows and develops, are also an essential part of maintaining good social skills. It is also extremely important that your new puppy be systematically exposed to new environments with positive rewards and stimuli at this time (e.g., sounds, odors, locations, sights, surfaces) to imprint in their minds that all these exposures are good and not scary.

Puppy socialization – what to do

It is essential that every puppy meets the sights and sounds with as many new people as possible (including babies, children, adults, and seniors), in a wide variety of situations, but be careful not to overwhelm it. Begin with calm introductions to one or two people at a time. If the pet handles this well, then more people, increased noise, and more activity can slowly be added. It is beneficial to ask each person who meets the puppy to give it a small piece of kibble or a tiny treat. This will teach the puppy to look forward to meeting people. It will also discourage hand shyness, since the puppy will learn to associate new people and an outstretched hand with something positive.

Once the puppy has learned to sit on command, have each new friend ask it to sit before giving the treat. This teaches a proper greeting and will make the puppy less likely to jump up on people. You should make certain that the puppy has the opportunity to meet and receive treats from a wide variety of people, especially those who differ from those in the family home. In the case of puppy socialization, variety is definitely the spice of life. The fear that might arise from the way a person looks, acts, sounds, moves, or perhaps even smells might be prevented by exposure during the socialization period. In particular, every effort must be made to see that the young pup has plenty of opportunities to learn about children. They can seem like a completely different species to dogs since they walk, act, and talk much differently than adults. Running, screaming, bicycles, roller blades and skateboards are also some of the varied stimuli that might be more common when children are around. Puppies that grow up without meeting children when they are young may never feel comfortable around them when they become adults. In addition, if you consider that perhaps you might want your pet one day to be a service or therapy dog, the range of possible sights, sounds, smells, actions, and interactions to which your dog might be exposed could also include riding on elevators, the sounds of hospital equipment, wheelchairs or the patient in a nursing home with a cane, walker, oxygen tank, or IV pole. Lack of experience with a variety of people during puppyhood is a common cause of social fear, avoidance, and biting.

Take the pup to visit friends’ homes to interact with them and with their pets. The ideal home is one with calm children and calm pets that don’t go out to parks or other areas where they might pick up disease organisms and bring them back home, and where the pets have received appropriate immunizations and parasite control. As soon as your puppy is adequately vaccinated, take it on as many walks and outings as possible. Just be careful to avoid areas where stray dogs roam that might carry diseases.

Puppy Play Date

Puppy classes

Puppy Sitting In Puppy PreschoolAttending puppy classes during the primary socialization period (which begins to wane by 12 – 14 weeks of age) is another excellent way of ensuring multiple contacts with a variety of people and other dogs. This relatively new concept in training involves enrolling puppies early, before they pick up bad habits, and at an age when they learn very quickly. Puppy training and socialization classes are now available in many communities where, with the proper health-care precautions, puppies can be admitted as early as 7 – 10 weeks of age. These classes can help puppies get off to a great start with training, and offer an excellent opportunity for important social experiences with other puppies and a wide variety of people. For further guidelines on puppy socialization and puppy classes, visit www.mistypinespetcompany.com.

Avoid unpleasant experiences

A young puppy’s interactions should always be supervised to ensure nothing happens that might make it afraid of people. Go slow with socialization exposure, and if the pet ever seems anxious, take some time out and then re-expose it to people in slightly calmer situations.

In addition, avoid all physical punishment. Harsh scolding or punishing a young pet will damage its bond with you and weaken its trust in people. Techniques such as swatting the pup, shaking it by the scruff, rubbing its face in a mess, and roughly forcing it onto its back should never be used. Pets that are raised using these methods may grow up to fear the human hand, and are more likely to display avoidance or become fear biters. In general, any interactions with people that might make a puppy anxious should be avoided, particularly during the early months of its life.

Socializing takes time and patience, but the benefits are worthwhile, so be sure not to miss the opportunity to guide your pup through this important process. Proper socialization will help ensure that your pet grows up to be social, friendly, and well adjusted.

At Misty Pines we have a unique center offering many socialization opportunities all within our 25 acre complex. Our Puppy Pre-School program introduces puppies from 7 – 12 weeks of age to various stimuli and situations that most puppies may not experience until later in life. Puppies are also introduced to other puppies, men, women, children, and obstacles. All of this creates positive associations in a controlled environment ensuring that your puppy develops happily and is less likely to develop fears, anxiety or behavior problems as they get older.

The unique sky lighted pavilion exercise yards within our complex gives puppies the opportunity to run and play with other puppies of a similar age while being supervised to ensure the play remains appropriate, fun and safe for everyone. While at Daycare all dogs are given periodic breaks to relax and mentally process what they have learned socially and also giving them an opportunity to positively experience being kenneled with all the new sights and sounds that go along with it for future boarding if you would require a home away from home while you are on vacation.

For over 40 years Misty Pines has striven to be the “Complete Pet Company” and when it comes to early socialization of puppies, you’ll find nowhere better. We encourage you to come for a visit and make use of our entire facility; with Dog TrainingPet BoardingDog DaycareDog Park Grounds, and Pet Grooming services all in one place, Misty Pines Pet Company is designed to serve many of your pet’s needs. Our goal is to help you and your pet build a happy and healthy relationship.

Reference

– Landsberg G, Hunthausen W, Ackerman L. 2013 Behavior Problems of the Dog and Cat.

Types of Dog Foods

There are four types of dog foods: canned, dry, semi-moist and raw. To a certain extent, the type of dog food determines which ingredients can be included in the ration, as well as the ultimate cost. Let’s look at each of the choices individually.

Canned Diets

Nature's Variety Canned Dog FoodCanned diets are sometimes referred to as “wet” or “moist.” There’s a good reason for this – they contain about 75 percent water. These are the common varieties of dog food that line the shelves in grocery stores and pet supply outlets. The percentage of water may seem excessive, but this is not significantly different than the amount of water present in fresh meat or in living animals. It may seem that the water content is designed to provide more filling than nutrients, but there is a reason for this. All canned foods are sterilized by high-pressure steam. The high water content is needed to ensure adequate and uniform heat penetration without burning some areas while inadequately cooking others.

Most meats used in canned foods are ground while they are still frozen. This helps reduce bacterial contamination of the product while promoting efficient grinding. The meat is then mixed with ground cereal, chopped vegetables and micronutrients. It is interesting to note that, for the most part, manufacturers discount the nutritional value of the ingredients and add vitamin and mineral “premixes” to the ration to meet the actual nutritional requirements of dogs. So, despite all the advertising hype of the nutritional value of the ingredients used in a dog’s food, most manufacturers concede that the processing removes much of the wholesomeness and goodness of the ingredients.

The “maintenance” diets are formulated with one-third meat and two thirds cereal, while the “luxury” or “gourmet” diets usually mix two-thirds meat with one third cereal. Even the so-called “all-meat” rations usually have about 10 percent carbohydrates. At this stage, some ingredients are “cold processed” by loading the ingredients directly in the can. Other manufacturers first heat the mixture to about 180 degrees F., which may produce colors and flavors, inactivate enzymes, and cause controlled swelling of starches. The canned ingredients are then sealed and loaded into a pressure cooker and processed.

Dry Foods

Dry foods, often referred to as “kibble,” were the first dog foods available commercially. Although they were originally baked on sheets and broken into pieces by a kibbling roller, this process has been replaced by extrusion. Extrusion uses pressure heating and steam cooking to treat the cereal-based product. The usual ingredients for these extruded dry foods include a source of protein (soybean meal, meat, fish, or poultry meal) and a carbohydrate (corn, wheat, barley, fat and vitamins and minerals).

To make dry foods, the ingredients are mixed together and steam heat is added to begin the cooking process. Later, the ingredients are removed to a pressure cooker and the finished product gets extruded and cut into appropriate pieces. At the final stage, the “kibble” can be sprayed with hot fats to increase palatability. The moisture content of these foods is reduced to about one percent by the use of hot air drying. Most extruders have a limitation in the fat content of the ration (8-10 percent) for mechanical reasons, but newer, twin-screw extruders can actually create a high-fat, dry dog food, (30 to 40 percent fat). Even with the old extruders, the fat content can be increased by overspraying the dry food once it is removed from the barrel of the extruder.

Dry Dog Food

Semi-moist Foods

Semi-Moist Dog FoodSemi-moist dog foods are intermediate between the dry and canned foods in their moisture content. These are the products that often look like hamburgers made for dogs, containing 25 – 35 percent water. It is hard to get much reliable information about semi-moist processing, because pet-food companies still regard this as a closely guarded trade secret. The trick to making a semi-moist dog food is to create a ration that isn’t canned, that contains appreciable moisture, that has a long shelf life, and that is not subject to mold growth. To accomplish this, “humectants” are added to the ration that allows the food to be “moist” yet bind the water so it is inaccessible to microbes. The most common humectants are glycols, sucrose (table sugar), and phosphoric acid.

Raw Dog Food

Raw dog food diets are controversial. But the popularity of the diets — which emphasize raw meat, bones, fruits, and vegetables — is rising.

Raw Dog FoodRacing greyhounds and sled dogs have long eaten raw food diets. Extending those feeding practices to the family pet is a more recent idea, proposed in 1993 by Australian veterinarian Ian Billinghurst. He called his feeding suggestions the BARF diet, an acronym that stands for Bones and Raw Food, or Biologically Appropriate Raw Food.

Billinghurst suggested that adult dogs would thrive on an evolutionary diet based on what canines ate before they became domesticated: Raw, meaty bones and vegetable scraps. Grain-based commercial pet foods, he contended, were harmful to a dog’s health.

Raw dog food diet: What it is

A raw dog food diet typically consists of: Muscle meat, often still on the bone, bones, either whole or ground, organ meats such as livers and kidneys, raw eggs, vegetables like broccoli, spinach, and celery, apples or other fruit, some dairy, such as yogurt.

People Food / Table Food (Raw & Cooked)

Homemade Dog Food

We hear quite often “do not ever feed your dog table food.” What should be said is, “Do not feed your dog from the table.” If you feed your dog from the table you will be training your dog to beg for food at the table, which may be offensive and inappropriate especially when we have guests. However; it is appropriate to supplement a dog’s daily ration with healthy left over table food. We would not suggest feeding such foods as Doritos, onions, grapes, raisins or chocolate but left over eggs, meats, fish, skins, green beans, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli leaves and stems mixed in with their daily ration can be very healthy for your dog. Ensure you google search a list of unhealthy foods for dogs. One of our recommendations to keep your dog healthy is to keep a Tupperware container in your refrigerator and place healthy people food (leftovers) into that container, then mix your dog’s normal daily ration, being dry, moist or raw then as a special treat, feed them that mixture. If you want eating to be more challenging, stuff this mixture into a Kong and have your dog mentally work to get its meal. This form of feeding stimulates a dog’s mind, an excellent problem solver for your dog. There is nothing wrong with periodic healthy table food supplementation. Feeding your dog from the table will create a table beggar.

We also suggest researching the ingredients in your dog’s food to determine if they are optimal ingredients for your dog. More on this subject next month.

Visit http://missouriscenicrivers.com/baddogfoods.html for a list of foods that are dangerous to dogs.

References:

“Canine Nutrition. What Every Owner, Breeder, and Trainer Should Know” – Lowell Ackerman, D.V.M.

“Raw Dog Food Diets” – WebMD Pet Health Feature – Elizabeth Lee – Reviewed by Audrey Cook, BVM&S

Jeff Woods, CPDT-KA


Therapy Dog Visits

Locations To Visit

Once your dog has passed their Therapy Dog International certification, it’s time for the fun to begin. Read below for a list of places that are always looking for registered therapy dogs to brighten the day of the patients and residents:

Click to view list

Services & Teams

If you would like to have Therapy Dogs visit your facility, please contact one of the following Therapy Dog Teams or contact Misty Pines to have your facility listed in the above section so that our teams may contact you. Click the link below for teams that are interested in visiting those in need of therapeutic visits from their furry friends:

Click to view list

“The golden gift is this: Intimately connected with his own emotions, the dog cannot lie. What he feels, he expresses. What he shows in his body posture is true, without guile, completely and utterly honest. Distanced from our own feelings, bound by our fears, we treasure and are amazed by this quality of complete truth in our dogs.”

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